Paris at the time of Philippe Auguste

Everyday life

Les métaux

The most important trades guild was the gold and silversmiths. "The work of the gold and silversmiths" writes Jean de Garland "was in the use of an iron anvil and light hammers to fashion gold and silver for encasing precious stones into the rings used by nobility"

The most important trades guild was the gold and silversmiths. "The work of the gold and silversmiths" writes Jean de Garland "was in the use of an iron anvil and light hammers to fashion gold and silver for encasing precious stones into the rings used by nobility"

The gold and silversmiths made considerable use of enamel in various ways, which was smelt and cast and was sometimes used as a background colour to highlight figures in relief, and sometimes for the figures themselves. Inlaid decorative work on engraved silver was also used extensively.

The gold and silversmiths also made silverware, drinking vessels, 'aiguières' , and plates.

Glassmakers made items of crystalware, fine stones, and clear or tinted cut glass stones. However they were forbidden from mixing these various materials. Despite their capabilities they were a long way from matching their rivals in Italy, especially those of Venice, where the finest blown glass was being made at that time.

The gold and silver 'wire drawers' drew out and reduced these metals to strands of gold or silver while the gold and silver leaf makers made leaf metal of extreme thinness. Thus fashioned, the gold was used for church decorative work, ladies costumery, illuminated parchments and other purposes.

Histoire des Corporations de Métiers
Etienne Martin Saint-Léon
1e édition 1897, 2e édition : 1909, 3e édition: 1922
p.204-5